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08-05-2011


Cumberlands Graduate Clerks for Local Judge

Williamsburg, Ky. - A recent graduate of University of the Cumberlands has returned to Whitley County to serve as a clerk to the local Circuit Court Judge.

Joshua Lowe, a Mudcreek, Ky. (Whitley County) native and 2010 graduate of Cumberlands, is clerking for Circuit Court Judge Dan Ballou as part of his formal law training at Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law.

Lowe, a graduate of Cumberlands’ Department of History and Political Science, was a favorite among his professors during his four years as a student.

Department Chair Dr. Eric Wake said, “We are proud of Josh. He worked extremely hard to get to where he is. He was never afraid to tackle a problem while he was at the University of the Cumberlands and he usually managed to conquer them. He will be a good lawyer because he will not be outworked.”

Associate Professor of Political Science Dr. Christopher Leskiw has nothing but glowing memories of his former student.

“Josh is one of the most memorable students I have ever had the pleasure of teaching. In point of fact, I would highly doubt many can forget him. He has a larger than life quality about him, a sparkle in his eye. Josh embodies the values that have made America strong. Much like one of his role models, John Wayne, Josh speaks plainly and knows the value of hard work. He sees the world in black and white and yearns for what is right and just. He is the kind of student who enjoys learning for its own sake. Josh was known for pushing his colleagues out of their intellectual comfort zones, and often led more of the class discussion than I did. Students of his caliber are far too rare. Simply put, I'm proud of what Josh has already accomplished and I have full confidence that his future will be equally as exceptional.”

Mr. Lowe said in a recent interview that his decision to pursue the law came about from his family. “All the women in my family are nurses,” said Lowe, “and my father did farm and factory work. They definitely pushed me into furthering my education in law, but it was my professors at Cumberland that got me through. Their continued encouragement compelled me first to stay in college and later to get through the difficult work” said Lowe.

Mr. Lowe credits the professors and staff of the History and Political Science Department as his preparation for law school. “In that department you read every day and you write every day; though when it comes down to it, work ethic is work ethic. The material learned might be different, but it’s still reading and writing.”

It was a surprise when Lowe got a call from Circuit Court Judge Dan Ballou to serve as his clerk. “He called me and I said yes, sir” Lowe said.

Real world experience in the form of clerking is part of the law school curriculum at Chase Law School, and coming back to Whitley County was always part of Lowe’s plan. He says that he wants to open his practice in Williamsburg, and that his experience working as a clerk with Judge Ballou is allowing him to learn the legal climate in the county and form new contacts and connections within the local legal community.

Part of Lowe’s duties this summer as a clerk to Judge Ballou is to write orders and memorandums for the Judge. “I like reading the law and I like writing the law,” said Lowe, “I just never thought that I would make my living reading and writing. It all came back to the work ethic, reading, and writing skills that I learned from the History Department and University of the Cumberlands.”

Located in Williamsburg, KY, University of the Cumberlands is an institution of regional distinction, which currently offers four undergraduate degrees in more than 40 major fields of study; nine pre-professional programs; nine graduate degrees, including two doctorates, a specialist, and six master’s degrees; certifications in education; and online programs.