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Course Descriptions

HSRV 131.  Survey of Human Services
This course offers a survey of the variety of human services issues facing the United States and the world today and the roles that professionals play in human services. This course provides multiple perspectives about many social welfare issues.  Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.

HSRV 234. Counseling Skills in Human Services
This course provides a study of the skills essential to interviewing and counseling with clients in the field of human services. Such skills include engagement, assessment, analysis, planning, intervening, and evaluating. The class is designed to foster experiential learning using interactive processes through the completion of communication and interviewing exercises and the application of human service interventions. These skills are achieved primarily through role play within the classroom. Co-requisite: HSRV 131. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.

HSRV 235. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
Conception through Adolescence This course is the first of a two-course sequence probing a chronological approach to the life span from an ecological/systems perspective and strengths framework. The material attends to human diversity and the effects of age, gender, and family structure. It focuses on human functioning from conception through adolescence and builds a knowledge and value base for practice across all system levels (micro, mezzo, and macro). The course incorporates content on culture, empowerment, gender differences, and racial and ethnic stereotypes. The purpose of this course, and its companion course (HSRV 236) is to build student knowledge of how human behavior interacts with the social environment. Prerequisite: HSRV 131. Offered fall semesters.

HSRV 236. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
Adulthood This course is the second of a two-course sequence probing a chronological approach to the life span from an ecological/systems perspective and strengths framework. The material attends to human diversity and the effects of age, gender, and family structure. It focuses on human functioning from young and middle adulthood through later adulthood and builds a knowledge and value base for practice across all system levels (micro, mezzo, and macro). The course incorporates content on culture, empowerment, gender differences, and racial and ethnic stereotypes. The purpose of this course, and its companion course (HSRV 235) is to build student knowledge of how human behavior interacts with the social environment. Prerequisite: HSRV 131. Offered spring semesters.

HSRV 331. Practice with Individuals & Families
This course focuses on integrating skills of the assessment and problem-solving processes with practice principles and interventions for families and groups. Research, assessment, and intervention planning are key components of the learning process within this course. Prerequisites: HSRV 234. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semesters.

HSRV 332. Practice with Groups & Communities
This course focuses on integrating practice principles and interventions for groups and communities in the human services realm. The class is designed to foster experiential learning through evaluation and role play within the classroom and active community assessment and intervention. Prerequisites: HSRV 234. Credit, 3 hours. Offered spring semesters.

HSRV 335. Social Research
This course studies the research process as it applies individuals, families, groups, and communities. Attention is given to the methods and techniques of social research including data collection, data analysis, and presentation of findings. Special attention is given to the issues of research on human beings such as diversity and ethical research. Prerequisites: HSRV 234. Offered spring semesters.

HSRV 337.  Race and Diversity
This course is intended to introduce students to diverse populations and help them understand the dynamics of practicing with people from backgrounds different from their own within the context of a human services field. The roles of racism, sexism, prejudice, and discrimination in American life and the conflict with basic Christian values will be discussed. Students will engage in hands-on learning about unfamiliar cultures. Junior or Senior status preferred. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.

HSRV 401. Child Abuse Investigation
This course, taught in tandem with CRJS 401, offers a basic instruction for students to help them understand the typical profiles of child abusers and the definitions of various forms of child abuse. This course will provide clarity of the definition of child abuse, also focusing on mental and physical abuse which is often difficult to prove in a court of law. This course will allow students to what they need to do to integrate the entire criminal process of investigating a child abuse/neglect case, starting with the official report, leading to the investigation (law enforcement and child protective services), which leads to the arrest and prosecution of alleged child abuse perpetrators. This course meets the general education outcomes for social and professional awareness. This Integrated Studies course can fulfill a requirement in Section VI of the General Education Curriculum. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall of even years.

HSRV 402. In Defense of Humanity
Human Rights Abuses and the World’s Responses This course, taught in tandem with POLS 402, seeks to capture the essence of the tragedy of human rights abuses worldwide. Human rights abuses include but are not limited to the following: genocide, slavery, sex trafficking, exploitation, abuse, rape, and political persecution. Far too often, cases of crimes against humanity pass virtually unnoticed in the eyes of the industrialized world. This class will attempt to raise awareness about past and contemporary human rights abuses. A framework will be introduced to students as to why and how these abuses unfold. Students will explore and discuss the options for solutions or interventions at any level. Students will satisfy the rigors of the QEP milestones of clarity, discernment, and integration in that they will confront a problem, explore the root causes of the issue, and then be asked to investigate viable solutions. This Integrated Studies course can fulfill a requirement in Section VI of the General Education Curriculum. Credit, 3 hours. Offered spring of odd years.

HSRV 432. Addictions and Recovery
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore human behavior from an addiction perspective. The course objective is to provide an introduction to the effects of psychoactive drugs, from the interactions between chemicals and brain cells to the psychological and physiological effects on the individual and show the impact upon community. The course is designed to address and explore multiple treatment methodologies and theories. Prerequisites: HSRV 131. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semesters.

HSRV 433. Social Policy Analysis
This course provides an overview of modern social policy. The formation process and historical basis of social policy within local, state, and federal political structures is studied. Public policies significantly impacting human services are reviewed with special attention given to policy outcomes and applications impacting the field. Prerequisites: HSRV 234. Offered fall semesters.

HSRV 435 Ethics in Human Services.
This course will introduce students to core questions concerning general morality with regard to ethical decision making.  Material will include but not be limited to theories of good versus bad and right versus wrong behavior. The natural norms found in society and how these norms affect professional decision-making will be examined. Ethical guidelines of the professional helping fields will be scrutinized. Prerequisite or co-requisite: HSRV 232. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall semesters.

HSRV 438. Applied Interventions
This course provides an opportunity for students to gain specialized intervention skills applicable in human services settings. Students will become knowledgeable about the theories driving the interventions studied, the application of those interventions within various field settings, and the impact of the interventions on particular client populations. Options for study may include but are not limited to: play therapy, sand tray therapy, kinetic drawing, guided imagery and hypnotherapy. Prerequisites: HSRV 234 and HSRV 331. Credit, 3 hours. Offered spring semesters.

HSRV 460. Special Topics in Human Services
This course is designed to address specialized topics in human services that are not otherwise available as a separate course. Examples include child welfare, Christian social ministries, aging, mental health, marriage and family, and human services practice in Appalachia. May be repeated once for credit up to a total of 6 semester hours provided topic is different. This course can be taken twice with different topics. Prerequisites: HSRV 131, SOCI 131. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.

HSRV 461. Internship and Seminar
This course provides the opportunity for human services students to work with individuals, groups and community organizations under the supervision of a professional in human services. The field experiences are systematically selected and provide opportunity for practice in a variety of human service settings. Specific policies and procedures are established to facilitate the field experiences. Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 clock hours. (Special permission may be granted to earn 3 hours credit (125 hours) during a Fall/Spring semester) A two hour weekly seminar is required. Departmental approval must be received the semester prior to being placed. Prerequisite: 18 credit hours in core courses of major and permission of department chair. Credit 6 hours. Offered fall, spring, and summer semesters.

HSRV 490. Special Topics in Human Services
This course is designed to address specialized topics in human services that are not otherwise available as a separate course. Examples include child welfare, Christian social ministries, aging, mental health, marriage and family, and human services practice in Appalachia. May be repeated once for credit up to a total of 6 semester hours provided topic is different. Prerequisites: HSRV 131, PSYC 131, SOCI 131. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.

SOCI 131.  Introduction to Sociology
This course offers a survey of basic concepts, theories, methods and research associated with the analysis of society and the scientific stuffy of human social activity. Particular attention will be given to the discipline of sociology as it relates to the resolution of current social problems and well-being within a social context. Credit, 3 hours. Offered fall and spring semesters.